iPad workflow part four

Screen grab from Transmit for iOS on my iPad showing a twelve image upload in action.

There are so many ways that I deliver images to various clients these days that I feel that I’m bound to leave something off of this list. The great news for users of the iPad or iPhone to do quick edits of their work is that every single option that I use on the desktop machine is also available on iOS devices;

  • FTP– I use Transmit on the iPad and iPhone. I also have FTP options inside FSN Pro and Shuttersnitch that can all do a good job but Transmit does it all better.
  • Email – adding large numbers of attachments on the iPad isn’t my favourite way to send pictures but it works.
  • Dropbox – The iOS Dropbox app means that I can easily add files to folders on the cloud service and send links to those folders before, during or after the job. It has a very simple interface and works really well.
  • WeTransfer – I wasn’t very happy when the WeTransfer iOS app went over to functioning as “Boards” – making it a very different user experience from the ever-so-simple desktop version but I’ve got used to it and it works really well.
  • Photoshelter – The professional image sharing platform has a dedicated iOS app which is fairly easy to use and very functional.
  • Third Light – This is a niche Digital Asset Management platform used by two of my corporate clients and the iOS app does its job well.

Six different image sharing/transmission options right there on my iPad and iPhone, all of which work well and the first four interact properly with the iOS Files system. Once I have saved my edits I can easily select whichever delivery method suits the job and send my pictures (assuming that I have an internet connection of course). Wherever possible I like to use FTP and having Transmit on the iPad and iPhone is a wonderful option because it is so versatile and because it has the ability to sync settings and passwords from my Mac computers. That means that I can send files to any FTP server that I have set up on my main computers and I can add new ones on iOS devices that get sync’ed to my Macs too. It has so much advanced functionality that I wouldn’t know where to begin listing it all – suffice to say that I have yet to come up against any situation where I’ve wanted something that it doesn’t do.

The way that FTP from the Transmit app works for me is simple. I locate the pictures in Files, select them and use the share option to select the Transmit app. In Transmit I select the FTP server that I wish to send the pictures to and then touch “Upload”. If there are any duplicate issues or if there are any other problems you get a notification but otherwise you just let the app do its job.

In many ways this is the most “sorted” part of the workflow because I have the same options as I do on a computer and those options are provided by the same developers. Sharing photos from iOS devices has pretty much been part of the operating system from day one and, because of that, it’s no surprise that it does it pretty well.

I have put a lot of emphasis on the Apple iOS Files system from the beginning of this exploration because I believe that it helps to keep my workflow a better ‘mirror’ of the the one that I use on my computers. One of the main reasons that I use Files is to stop the Apple Photos app from renaming the pictures – something that Apple needs to address if it is going to continue to market the iPad (and especially the iPad Pro) as a business device and a potential replacement for the laptop. The other advantage of using the Files system is that the images can be automatically added to iCloud providing an extra layer of back ups. Of course iCloud works best (and cheapest) where you have good wifi rather than relying on cellular and 4G connections.

All-in-all delivering pictures from iOS devices is easy to set up and easy to do – if only the import and editing parts of the process were so well sorted!

iPad Workflow – a work in progress

iPad workflow part two – importing the images

iPad workflow part three – captioning and toning the pictures

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